Staying Up-To-Date on Social Media & Digital Marketing Trends


I get this question all the time “How do you keep track of what’s happening in social media?” The thing is, if I spent all day reading up on the endless possibilities and tips and “best practices” on social… I wouldn’t have time to implement any of them. So, here’s my strategy on staying current so that I can create effective strategies:


Subscribing to useful newsletters is a great way to have digital strategy news spoonfed to you, I like to read these as a productive excuse to not get out of bed in the morning, on the stationary bicycle, on the bus, or on the toilet (sorry if that’s TMI.)

  • SocialCode’s The Daily Code: social advertising insights, delivered to your inbox on a daily basis
  • Glossy: this is digiday’s site dedicated to how technology is modernizing the fashion and luxury industries.
  • AdWeek’s SocialTimes: SocialTimes covers a lot of partnerships, promotions, and updates.
  • MediaBistro: I enjoy both MediaBistro’s “Morning Media Newsfeed,” their “Social Media Newsfeed,” and “Revolving Door Newsletter.” As you can imagine, “Morning Media Newsfeed” covers general events in pop culture, news, politics, sports, etc., and the “Social Media Newsfeed” covers the latest in social media… the “Revolving Door Newsletter” may or not be your “thing.” I enjoy it 1) because I’m nosy, and 2) it gives some insight in to company’s structure, interesting career trajectories, and also where companies are heading. For example, when ESPN hires someone with a video production background… the implication is that ESPN is building out more content divisions… that type of thing. It’s my crystal ball more than anything. This link may prompt you to sign up for MediaBistro before you can subscribe, they also have an assortment of great newsletters specific to agencies, DC, New York, book publishing, PR, and TV.
  • Clover: Ok, so Clover is technically for teenage girls… I’m no longer that. However, I feel like this gives a bit of insight in to what teenage girls (presumably) are interested in. Clover is founded by former magazine editors Liza Darwin and Casey Lewis (Darwin: Nylon and Sweet, Lewis: Teen Vogue). Read more about the letter’s launch/origins on WWD here. The letter highlights young female creators, politics, and recently introduced a poetry series. Clover warms my heart because it reminds me of a digital Sassy, while simultaneously giving me insight in to a world that’s just a few years out of my reach.



I keep a Twitter list of digital marketing sources I find really helpful: This list is kept pretty slim (I’ve removed a few accounts that tweet too much, or tweet content that’s already getting a lot of coverage so that this feed isn’t redundant). Within this list is Digiday, Digiday’s Glossy, AdWeek, SimplyMeasure, and Union Metrics for right now (June 2016). You’ll notice some repeats from the newsletter list above, and that’s intentional🙂


Specific Companies

There are a few brands that regularly stand out in social innovation that I pay close attention to: Burberry, General Electric, IBM, Nike and Vice. Do some googling of “Burberry social media campaign” or “IBM tumblr” and you’ll see what I mean. You might also be in to this list of my favorite Tumblrs I made awhile back… they’re still pretty good (IBM & Nike are on this list).



Starting The Vault Podcast

A few months ago, my good friend, photographer Avery D’Alessandro, approached me with an idea: a podcast interviewing professionals across the fashion industry, to educate those seeking to break in to fashion. He’d just finished shooting New York and Paris Fashion Weeks, and was reflecting on the bottleneck of people in fashion and those who want to be in fashion. He knows I’m a big fan of information sharing, and I assume he must have noticed my constant tweets and Facebook posts about my love for podcasts, and he definitely knew that I love fashion and had a brief stint in the world of music and DJs. I was super excited about the project, we made a few decisions, I did some research, bought mics, and then had a vacation planned. While I was in Hawaii and Japan, he was recording the first few episodes of The Vault, which we launched January 18th.

I’m going to continue to build on this overtime, but I wanted to share my collected learnings thus far about launching a podcast. We both continue to learn and grow, but if you’re looking to start a podcast, here’s what I’ve got for you. (In order, mostly, of how Avery and I did this.)


Avery managed the branding: found a designer to do our artwork with the correct specs for the iTunes Store, thought of the name, and I’m sure more details that I’m forgetting now. All I know, is that I got back from vacation to beautiful artwork, a solid podcast name, and interviews to edit.

Specs for your podcast artwork (straight from the iTunes‘ horses’ mouth): Cover art must be in the JPEG or PNG file formats and in the RGB color space with a minimum size of 1400 x 1400 pixels and a maximum size of 3000 x 3000 pixels.

Here’s our artwork that we use on iTunes, SoundCloud and across our social platforms:

The Vault Podcast

The Vault Podcast

Equipment: Gear/Tech

Blue Microphones Yet USB Microphone / Bundle
810YezTuMWL._SL1500_ 51tBq6oJbdL

I bought both of of these off of Amazon, if you only have one USB port in your laptop, buy a splitter. I bought the same pop filter that comes in the bundle deal separately for the silver mic.

Skype + Call Recorder + Audacity + Audio Hijack

If you’re recording remotely, use Skype paired with Call Recorder (Mac).

I like the interface of editing in Audacity, you’ll also need Lame mp3 encoder to export mp3 files. These are free.

For in-person, we started using Audio Hijack from Rogue Amoeba, I’m still figuring it out, but the interface is sexy. It’s $49 for a license key, but well-worth it. Rogue Amoeba seems to have quite a few cool products worth exploring, and reasonably priced.

To edit in Audacity, I recommend stacking your files in order of appearance (chronologically).

Digital Presence

We decided to use Avery’s website as our blog, since it already exists, Squarespace is easy to use.

Instagram is pretty obvious to us since we’re both photographers, and knew we’d be attending New York and Paris Fashion Weeks for both the podcast and our content partnerships. We share Instagrammable moments here, quotes from our guests, tease episodes, etc. Follow us @thevaultpodcast. We’re also on Twitter, sharing relevant content from other fashion sources such as the Business of Fashion, WWD, and WGSN, at @vaultpodcast. We converted Avery’s Facebook photography page to be The Vault’s Facebook page.

I’m a huge fan of both Tumblr and We Heart It, and then lucky for us, We Heart It came on as a sponsor, so I was excited to have a reason, outside of my own preferences, to build a We Heart It following, granted these two platforms may not make sense for your podcast.

Going Live

So here are a few things I wish someone would have told me:

Figure out what category you want to be in, we should have been in Society & Culture, but my late night flawed logic caused me to think that the Business category would be a good idea… now we have to resubmit and to my understanding, our audience will get segmented on iTunes. I’ve seen other podcasts do it, they’ve survived, it just bums me out. Explore the categories ahead of time and decide with your partner where you should be.

We’re on SoundCloud and use Feedity as our RSS reader, which is how our content gets pushed to iTunes. You also need to submit your podcast for review, using your RSS reader, it takes a day or two to go through (in my experience). Details on submitting your podcast to iTunes here.

Here’s our first episode, where Avery interviews photographer Adam Katz Sinding. This was recorded using Skype + Call Recorder. I’d love your feedback, and if you disagree or have better recos, or have fun tools I should be using… please enlighten me🙂

Artifact Uprising 5×5″ Photo Prints


I placed my Artifact Uprising order on November 20, 2015 ordering 25 5×5″ prints. On November 25, 2015, I was notified that my order was shipping, and I received the order on November 27, 2015. The photos feel great, the cardstock is good quality, and I appreciate their minimal packaging. It’s efficient and environmentally-friendly.

Note: I realized after recording this video that Artifact Uprising allows your to go through your VSCO Library, rather than you VSCO Grid, which is what I assumed I was looking at. I wish they let you go through your Grid, because that’s where (I assume) most of us have more photos.

You can order 25 5×5″ prints here.

Artifact Uprising is a VSCO company, they offer photo books, prints, cards, and wall art. When you’re selecting your photos, you’re able to pull from you VSCO Library, Instagram, or upload photos from your computer.

These prints are great, and I’m excited to send the ones I had printed for family and friends to them as gifts.

Check out the Artifact Uprising blog here:
Follow me on VSCO here:

My Favorite Tumblrs (for now)

Some of these are for their theme, some for their content, some (like IBMblr) are for both.



Visually and mentally stimulating, IBM’s Tumblr brings you an incredible content mix. GIFs, videos, images, and more cover a variety of categories. IBM utilizes Tumblr’s “categories” feature beautifully. Use the hamburger menu titled “Explore” at the top to check out a variety of content that can keep you entertained while learning for hours. Some of my favorites? I’m glad you asked.

Patents – teaches you about incredible, and sometimes odd, patents that IBM has, information about patents, and more.

Fractals – need I say more?

Women in Tech – I look forward to a day where this category type isn’t necessary, because there are enough women commonly in tech that they’re naturally included in content/news updates. Until then, this is pretty cool, and if nothing else, inspiring for my fellow females.

Nike Women

I’m not going to pretend like I was lusting after the Nike Women Tumblr before Tumblr called out their “Better For It” campaign… because I wasn’t. But I am now! Nike has done it again (ha ha) with endless amounts of fitness gifs that make fitness look fun and approachable and not only for Karlie Kloss. Of course, they had well-written copy to accompany each one. It’s beautiful.

Danny Brown

You read right. The energetic, sometimes grimey, Detroit rapper has an amazing Tumblr. I stumbl(r)ed upon it when he reblogged a pic I took of him, and immediately thought “Danny, either you and/or your management have your shit very much together.” I don’t know why more artists don’t have such well laid out, cohesive, and easy to navigate themes / setups. The content itself is pretty straightforward and fan-friendly (lots of reblogs). Perfect lineup of social links for the normal platforms and music platforms (Spotify + Soundcloud).


If you’re monochrome loving like I am… Monvrchy is your heaven. Everything is essentially only black and white. The theme is pretty simple, but the content is BEAUTIFUL. Always. Every day.

Best of Vogue

This is not literally “the best of Vogue,” but it is all the best of vogue. The girl who curates it, Elle Wilson, a student at the Fashion Institute of Technology does a beautiful job of putting together stunning ads, editorial campaigns, quotes, and magazine covers. This Tumblr is a stylist’s dream for curating moodboard content. A fashion time machine. If I could force myself to be this consistent with my content, and wasn’t all over the place… I’d be MUCH better at the internet / my personal brand.

These are just a few of my favorites, I’m sure I’ll think of more. But these are all fairly different, and inspirational in their own ways. Let me know if you have any personal favorites, please include why🙂

Top Questions to Consider When Booking a Photo Booth

My good friend and I started a photo booth company years back. Since then we’ve done hundreds of weddings, sent them on tours, worked with corporate clients such as T-Mobile, Coca-Cola, and AT&T. Luckily for me, he already had tons of experience in events, and knew what kind of questions to ask. Over the years on both the photo booth vendor side and the side of friends who have booked photo booths with companies and were disappointed, I’ve decided to share a list of questions to consider while booking a photo booth (or flipbook booth) for your wedding, party, or corporate event.

  • How will the booth get power? Photo booths require power, make sure you’re having your photo booth set up with electricity taken in to consideration. Place it near (within 50 feet) of an outlet, and consider the fact a power cable will be running to/from the outlet.
  • Steps for taking photos. Photo booth programs are usually fairly easy to customize. Some vendors have their booths automatically request a phone number and/or email. Ask to test it out yourself, and put in your number/email to see how it looks. If you’re doing a corporate event and don’t want people to feel uncomfortable by sharing that information, request that the photo booth company turn the feature off. You should also be able to customize the message guests receive if you want to, ask about that option as well if you’re interested.
  • Attendant. Ask if there will be an attendant who stays with the booth to help.
  • Background: Is the booth open? Enclosed? If you don’t want to pay for a backdrop or enclosure, fear not! People can stand close to the camera, thus, taking up most of the frame.
  • Event timing. If you want to save money by paying for a booth at the beginning or a few hours in to your event, take into consideration the location of the booth and how the photo booth attendant can set up without disturbing your event.
  • Post-event. Are you getting digital copies of your photos? Do you want to? To save money, ask the company if you can get them for free (or less) if you opt to receive them digitally versus a flash drive.

I hope this helps your quest for a seamless eventphoto booth wedding cousins

How It’s Made, Why It Matters

Buying “ethically” is a concept I was raised with. My dad was big on quality, because quality products create less waste. In learning more about supply chains, I’ve found that so few of us think about the impact of our purchasing. There are so many factors to consider: raw materials sourcing, manufacturing, distribution, waste. Within each of these categories there’s a few questions to be considered:

How is the earth treated in producing this?

How are people treated?

How does it get from the manufacturer to me?

What happens to this product when I’m done with it?

One company that’s doing an interesting job is OurVodka, they’re a global vodka company but their products are made locally in cities around the world (New York, Seattle, Detroit, Berlin, to name a few). What are some of your favorites?

ourvodka berlin

For some more information, watch The True Cost, available on Amazon, Netflix, and the Apple Store.

The Broad Museum – Los Angeles

Nearly a year ago I was visiting the MOCA on Grand Ave, when I noticed a beautiful building under construction. That building, as it turns out, is The Broad, a new contemporary art museum built by philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad on Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles. The Broad is now open, and is free to visitors.

As we entered The Broad, I couldn’t help but smile at the work of LA-based artist Robert Therrien’s oversized stacked plates that greeted us. The smiles continued, as stunning pieces waited for us around each corner.

As we moved throughout the museum, I was struck by the immense amount of work in the 120,000 square foot space. It’s the who’s who of modern art: Jeff Koons, Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Yayoi Kusama, Takashi Murakami, Cy Twombly, and many more. Find more information here to plan your visit, I’d love to hear what your favorite pieces are.

@laurenglasses always having the best ideas ☺️ #TheBroad #RobertTherrien

A photo posted by Lynae Cook (@lynaecook) on


A photo posted by Lynae Cook (@lynaecook) on


A photo posted by Lynae Cook (@lynaecook) on


A photo posted by Lynae Cook (@lynaecook) on

Vancouver, B.C. – Birthe Piontek “Lying Still”

It took me nearly two years of living in San Francisco to find the Harvey Milk Photography Center, which I was thrilled to get involved with…. and within a week or two I was recruited for a job in Seattle before I could get started. I made sure that once I moved to the Emerald City, I started looking for communities in Seattle. Luckily, I found Photographic Center Northwest, and I couldn’t be happier!

Before becoming a member, I took a food styling class with the talented Aran Goyoaga. I decided shortly thereafter to join, and have since participated in Longshot, enjoyed Henry Horenstein’s “Racing Days”, Terminal: On Morality and Beauty, and most recently, went on a gallery tour with Birthe Piontek at Gallery 295 in Vancouver, B.C.

Photos from Birhe Piontek’s “Lying Still” and Vancouver explorations below.


A photo posted by Lynae Cook (@lynaecook) on

quite the opposite tbh #vancouverforaday

A photo posted by Lynae Cook (@lynaecook) on

color block + texture mix + vine play #jj_forum_1203

A photo posted by Lynae Cook (@lynaecook) on

walked Vancouver today.

A photo posted by Lynae Cook (@lynaecook) on

I hear the City Center Motor Hotel will be the next Ace Hotel (Twitter told me)

I hear the City Center Motor Hotel will be the next Ace Hotel (Twitter told me)

See Birthe Piontek’s “Lying Still” here.